Posts Tagged 'Trials'

2 Samuel Chapter 15

Absalom was the son of David, whom he was reconciled with several years after Absalom had killed his other son. However, the promise and curse to David, was that his house would continue to see the sword from the time that he had planned the death of Uriah. I think that this would mean that he and his family would have great contentions among themselves. The curse from the Lord, goes on to say, “I will raise up evil against thee out of thine own house” (see 2 Samuel 12:11). David’s future was not going to have peace and joy with his family. This chapter continues to describe the fulfillments of the promises from the Lord, to David and his house. It begins:

1 And it came to pass after this, that Absalom prepared him chariots and horses, and fifty men to run before him.
2 And Absalom rose up early, and stood beside the way of the gate: and it was so, that when any man that had a controversy came to the king for judgment, then Absalom called unto him, and said, Of what city art thou? And he said, Thy servant is of one of the tribes of Israel.
3 And Absalom said unto him, See, thy matters are good and right; but there is no man deputed of the king to hear thee.
4 Absalom said moreover, Oh that I were made judge in the land, that every man which hath any suit or cause might come unto me, and I would do him justice!
5 And it was so, that when any man came nigh to him to do him obeisance, he put forth his hand, and took him, and kissed him.
6 And on this manner did Absalom to all Israel that came to the king for judgment: so Absalom stole the hearts of the men of Israel.

Absalom begin to build himself an army. He made a place for himslef near the gates of the city. When people came to bring their complaints to the king, which was part of the course of everyday life for David, Absalom would stop them and ask them where they were from. He would tell them that they were right to come there, but no one was able to hear their case. Then he would say something like, “If only I was a judge over the land, when any man would come to me, I would give him justice.” He put on a show of love for all men of Israel. Because he did this, he began to steal away the hearts of the people.

7 And it came to pass after forty years, that Absalom said unto the king, I pray thee, let me go and pay my vow, which I have vowed unto the Lord, in Hebron.
8 For thy servant vowed a vow while I abode at Geshur in Syria, saying, If the Lord shall bring me again indeed to Jerusalem, then I will serve the Lord.
9 And the king said unto him, Go in peace. So he arose, and went to Hebron.

After time had past, Absalom asked David if he could leave and pay his vow in Hebron. He said that he had made a promise to the Lord, to serve him, if He would allow him to return to Jerusalem. David allowed Absalom to go to Hebron.

10 But Absalom sent spies throughout all the tribes of Israel, saying, As soon as ye hear the sound of the trumpet, then ye shall say, Absalom reigneth in Hebron.
11 And with Absalom went two hundred men out of Jerusalem, that were called; and they went in their simplicity, and they knew not any thing.
12 And Absalom sent for Ahithophel the Gilonite, David’s counsellor, from his city, even from Giloh, while he offered sacrifices. And the conspiracy was strong; for the people increased continually with Absalom.

Absalom planned for the people to rise up with him in Jerusalem, at the sound of a trumpet. The people who supported Absalom, were to announce that Absalom reigned. He took two hundred men with him, without drawing attention to themselves. Absalom called for a man named Ahithophel, who was David’s counsellor. Absalom continued to grow in strength with the support of the people.

13 And there came a messenger to David, saying, The hearts of the men of Israel are after Absalom.
14 And David said unto all his servants that were with him at Jerusalem, Arise, and let us flee; for we shall not else escape from Absalom: make speed to depart, lest he overtake us suddenly, and bring evil upon us, and smite the city with the edge of the sword.
15 And the king’s servants said unto the king, Behold, thy servants are ready to do whatsoever my lord the king shall appoint.
16 And the king went forth, and all his household after him. And the king left ten women, which were concubines, to keep the house.
17 And the king went forth, and all the people after him, and tarried in a place that was far off.
18 And all his servants passed on beside him; and all the Cherethites, and all the Pelethites, and all the Gittites, six hundred men which came after him from Gath, passed on before the king.

David learned that the hearts of the people had turned towards Absalom. He took his servants and all but ten concubines, and they fled the city of Jerusalem. Many others left with David.

19 Then said the king to Ittai the Gittite, Wherefore goest thou also with us? return to thy place, and abide with the king: for thou art a stranger, and also an exile.
20 Whereas thou camest but yesterday, should I this day make thee go up and down with us? seeing I go whither I may, return thou, and take back thy brethren: mercy and truth be with thee.
21 And Ittai answered the king, and said, As the Lord liveth, and as my lord the king liveth, surely in what place my lord the king shall be, whether in death or life, even there also will thy servant be.
22 And David said to Ittai, Go and pass over. And Ittai the Gittite passed over, and all his men, and all the little ones that were with him.
23 And all the country wept with a loud voice, and all the people passed over: the king also himself passed over the brook Kidron, and all the people passed over, toward the way of the wilderness.

David told Ittai of Gittite, that he and his people could return to their home, instead of going with David. But Ittai said that he would serve the king and remain with him wherever he was. So, Ittai and all the people with him, left with the king, and all of them escaped towards the wilderness.

24 And lo Zadok also, and all the Levites were with him, bearing the ark of the covenant of God: and they set down the ark of God; and Abiathar went up, until all the people had done passing out of the city.
25 And the king said unto Zadok, Carry back the ark of God into the city: if I shall find favour in the eyes of the Lord, he will bring me again, and shew me both it, and his habitation:
26 But if he thus say, I have no delight in thee; behold, here am I, let him do to me as seemeth good unto him.
27 The king said also unto Zadok the priest, Art not thou a seer? return into the city in peace, and your two sons with you, Ahimaaz thy son, and Jonathan the son of Abiathar.
28 See, I will tarry in the plain of the wilderness, until there come word from you to certify me.
29 Zadok therefore and Abiathar carried the ark of God again to Jerusalem: and they tarried there.

Zadok and the Levites that were with him, brought the ark out of the city, but David told them to take it back. He felt that if the Lord wanted him to regain the city, the Lord would bring him back to it. If he did not want him to go back to Jerusalem, David felt the Lord could do what he wanted with him. He told Zadok that he would remain in the wilderness and he would wait for word from Zadok, letting him know he could return. Zadok and his sons returned to Jerusalem, taking the ark with them.

30 And David went up by the ascent of mount Olivet, and wept as he went up, and had his head covered, and he went barefoot: and all the people that was with him covered every man his head, and they went up, weeping as they went up.

David left by way of Mount Olivet. He and all the people with him, went away crying and in an attitude of mourning.

31 And one told David, saying, Ahithophel is among the conspirators with Absalom. And David said, O Lord, I pray thee, turn the counsel of Ahithophel into foolishness.

One of his people, told David that his counselor, Ahithophel, had been among the consipirators. David prayed that the Lord would cause the man’s counsel to be foolishness for Absalom.

32 And it came to pass, that when David was come to the top of the mount, where he worshipped God, behold, Hushai the Archite came to meet him with his coat rent, and earth upon his head:
33 Unto whom David said, If thou passest on with me, then thou shalt be a burden unto me:
34 But if thou return to the city, and say unto Absalom, I will be thy servant, O king; as I have been thy father’s servant hitherto, so will I now also be thy servant: then mayest thou for me defeat the counsel of Ahithophel.
35 And hast thou not there with thee Zadok and Abiathar the priests? therefore it shall be, that what thing soever thou shalt hear out of the king’s house, thou shalt tell it to Zadok and Abiathar the priests.
36 Behold, they have there with them their two sons, Ahimaaz Zadok’s son, and Jonathan Abiathar’s son; and by them ye shall send unto me every thing that ye can hear.
37 So Hushai David’s friend came into the city, and Absalom came into Jerusalem.

When David had reached the top of the mountain, he worshipped the Lord. An Archite man, named Husahi, came to him in mourning. David told him that he would be a burden to the king, if he stayed with him, but if he went instead and offered himself as a servant to Absalom, he could help by defeating the counsel of Ahithophel. He could be a spy for David, and pass on word to Zadok and Abiathar. They would pass along word to David through their own sons, Ahimaz and Jonathan. Hushai did as David asked and Absalom went into Jerusalem.

There is no reason given, for Absalom’s betrayal of his father. As far as the scriptures show, Absalom should have been grateful that his life was spared after he had killed his own brother. I wonder if David realized how this was a part of the fulfillment of the word of the Lord to him. He must have known that his reign was not going to be peaceful, and that sorrow would come through his own household. I imagine that this action would have made his heart heavy with sadness, and that he may have wondered how the remainder of the curse from the Lord, would play out in his life.

Through it all, David continued to be an example to me of a man who wanted to do what was right. He had made mistakes in his past, but he knew that Jerusalem was the better place for the ark and the priests to remain. He was not going to be a selfish king by taking the ark from the people while he had to hide away. He was using wisdom, by not assuming he knew where the ark should be, but that the Lord would help him to know where he should be in relation to the ark. Moreover, David continued to worship the Lord, even though he was going through hard trials. He did not blame God for the circumstance that he was in. It is clear to me, that David had not become prideful in his position as king, but rather he knew his place and wanted to be the leader God wanted him to be. David accepted this new trial humbly. I hope that I will be willing to accept more of the difficulties that come into my life with humility and trust in the Lord. I know that if we are faithful, God will bless us through our own trials.

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2 Samuel Chapter 14

Absalom, was the son of David, who had killed his brother out of revenge. He had fled to Geshur, where he had family from his Mother’s side. David wanted to see his son, in fact the last verse of chapter 13, said that his soul longed to go to him. Joab, who led the king’s army and happened to be his nephew, was a faithful servant to David. This chapter tells the story of what Joab did to help the king.

1 Now Joab the son of Zeruiah perceived that the king’s heart was toward Absalom.
2 And Joab sent to Tekoah, and fetched thence a wise woman, and said unto her, I pray thee, feign thyself to be a mourner, and put on now mourning apparel, and anoint not thyself with oil, but be as a woman that had a long time mourned for the dead:
3 And come to the king, and speak on this manner unto him. So Joab put the words in her mouth.

Joab made a plan for a wise woman to go to king David disguised as a woman who mourned for a long time. He told her the words to speak to David.

4 And when the woman of Tekoah spake to the king, she fell on her face to the ground, and did obeisance, and said, Help, O king.
5 And the king said unto her, What aileth thee? And she answered, I am indeed a widow woman, and mine husband is dead.
6 And thy handmaid had two sons, and they two strove together in the field, and there was none to part them, but the one smote the other, and slew him.
7 And, behold, the whole family is risen against thine handmaid, and they said, Deliver him that smote his brother, that we may kill him, for the life of his brother whom he slew; and we will destroy the heir also: and so they shall quench my coal which is left, and shall not leave to my husband neither name nor remainder upon the earth.
8 And the king said unto the woman, Go to thine house, and I will give charge concerning thee.
9 And the woman of Tekoah said unto the king, My lord, O king, the iniquity be on me, and on my father’s house: and the king and his throne be guiltless.
10 And the king said, Whosoever saith ought unto thee, bring him to me, and he shall not touch thee any more.
11 Then said she, I pray thee, let the king remember the Lord thy God, that thou wouldest not suffer the revengers of blood to destroy any more, lest they destroy my son. And he said, As the Lord liveth, there shall not one hair of thy son fall to the earth.
12 Then the woman said, Let thine handmaid, I pray thee, speak one word unto my lord the king. And he said, Say on.
13 And the woman said, Wherefore then hast thou thought such a thing against the people of God? for the king doth speak this thing as one which is faulty, in that the king doth not fetch home again his banished.
14 For we must needs die, and are as water spilt on the ground, which cannot be gathered up again; neither doth God respect any person: yet doth he devise means, that his banished be not expelled from him.
15 Now therefore that I am come to speak of this thing unto my lord the king, it is because the people have made me afraid: and thy handmaid said, I will now speak unto the king; it may be that the king will perform the request of his handmaid.
16 For the king will hear, to deliver his handmaid out of the hand of the man that would destroy me and my son together out of the inheritance of God.
17 Then thine handmaid said, The word of my lord the king shall now be comfortable: for as an angel of God, so is my lord the king to discern good and bad: therefore the Lord thy God will be with thee.
18 Then the king answered and said unto the woman, Hide not from me, I pray thee, the thing that I shall ask thee. And the woman said, Let my lord the king now speak.
19 And the king said, Is not the hand of Joab with thee in all this? And the woman answered and said, As thy soul liveth, my lord the king, none can turn to the right hand or to the left from ought that my lord the king hath spoken: for thy servant Joab, he bade me, and he put all these words in the mouth of thine handmaid:
20 To fetch about this form of speech hath thy servant Joab done this thing: and my lord is wise, according to the wisdom of an angel of God, to know all things that are in the earth.

The woman pleaded for help from David. She told David a story about her problem. She said that she was a widow with two sons. Her sons had been together in a field and one killed the other. She said that her family was all against her at this time, because they wanted her to deliver up the son who had killed his brother, so that they could kill him for his crime. If they did this, they would take away the heir of her family, leaving her alone and she would be left with nothing. In the law of Moses, it was known that the family of one who had been killed by another, where allowed to seek revenge out of justice. The family would not have been in trouble for doing so according to the law. However, David told her to return to her home and he would take charge of her. She told him that the problem was for her and her family, but that the king was not responsible. David told her that anyone who spoke against her, could be sent to the king and she would be protected. She reminded the king that he would not allow anyone to kill her son by revenge, as she said her family planned to do. David promised that no one would be allowed to harm her son. The woman asked to speak further with the king and he allowed her. Then, she said, what she had really come to say. She said that the king himself did this thing, by not allowing his own banished son to return home. Everyone will die and no one is different in the eyes of God. But God works to bring home those that are banished from Him, because he is a merciful God. If the king was willing to hear her story and help her, she suggested that she reveal herself and the Lord would be with David in deciding what to do. David told her to reveal herself to him. He asked her if Joab had arranged this. She admitted that this was true and that David had been wise.

21 And the king said unto Joab, Behold now, I have done this thing: go therefore, bring the young man Absalom again.
22 And Joab fell to the ground on his face, and bowed himself, and thanked the king: and Joab said, To day thy servant knoweth that I have found grace in thy sight, my lord, O king, in that the king hath fulfilled the request of his servant.
23 So Joab arose and went to Geshur, and brought Absalom to Jerusalem.
24 And the king said, Let him turn to his own house, and let him not see my face. So Absalom returned to his own house, and saw not the king’s face.

David recognized what he had done and told Joab to bring Absalom to him. Joab thanked David for it, honoring him with a blessing, and went to bring Absalom from Geshur. He told Joab to have Absalom go back to his home and not to come to the king at this point. According to the chapter header, this was about three years since he had left Jerusalem.

25 But in all Israel there was none to be so much praised as Absalom for his beauty: from the sole of his foot even to the crown of his head there was no blemish in him.
26 And when he polled his head, (for it was at every year’s end that he polled it: because the hair was heavy on him, therefore he polled it:) he weighed the hair of his head at two hundred shekels after the king’s weight.
27 And unto Absalom there were born three sons, and one daughter, whose name was Tamar: she was a woman of a fair countenance.

Absalom was described as a man of great beauty, without blemish, and long and heavy hair. He had three sons, and a beautiful daughter named Tamar. In returning, he would have been able to go back to his family again.

28 So Absalom dwelt two full years in Jerusalem, and saw not the king’s face.
29 Therefore Absalom sent for Joab, to have sent him to the king; but he would not come to him: and when he sent again the second time, he would not come.
30 Therefore he said unto his servants, See, Joab’s field is near mine, and he hath barley there; go and set it on fire. And Absalom’s servants set the field on fire.
31 Then Joab arose, and came to Absalom unto his house, and said unto him, Wherefore have thy servants set my field on fire?
32 And Absalom answered Joab, Behold, I sent unto thee, saying, Come hither, that I may send thee to the king, to say, Wherefore am I come from Geshur? it had been good for me to have been there still: now therefore let me see the king’s face; and if there be any iniquity in me, let him kill me.
33 So Joab came to the king, and told him: and when he had called for Absalom, he came to the king, and bowed himself on his face to the ground before the king: and the king kissed Absalom.

For two years, Absalom lived in Jerusalem, without seeing his father’s face. Absalom asked Joab to go to the king for him, but he would not do it. He asked again and was denied again. Absalom had his servants set Joab’s field on fire, in order to get his attention. Joab came to him and asked him why he had done this thing. Absalom said that he wanted Joab to go to the king and ask him why he had brought him from Geshur. He could have stayed there and it would have been good, as he was safe from harm there, but now he wanted to see the face of his father, the king. If the king felt there was any iniquity in Absalom, he could have him killed, according to the law. Joab went to the king and told him this, and Absalom was called for by David. He came to the king and bowed to the ground before him. David kissed his son to show that he was reconciled to him.

It could not have been easy for David to handle these situations within his own family. As the king, he would have had so much to do and think about for his people. Adding the difficulty that must have existed knowing Amnon had taken advantage of his daughter, would have been hard enough for any loving father. Then, having Amnon, his first born son, killed out of revenge for it, must have been heartbreaking. Finally, Absalom had fled to another land and was no longer in Jerusalem with the rest of his family. David’s heart must have been aching and struggling to know how to grieve, comfort, and forgive, while still remaining a strong and able king for Israel. Joab was kind to risk his standing with David, to show him that he needed to forgive and bring his son back into his life in order to have peace come to his heart. Sometimes, in order to give greater help to those we love, we have to take risks, or make decisions, that may hurt them. Sometimes these decisions might hurt us as well, but it is true charity, to care for the welfare of another soul in doing so. Though it is not exactly related, I can’t help but think of the example of the Savior. He made the decision to follow through with the atonement and crucifixion. He chose to hurt His closest friends by leaving them and allowing them to go on without Him, and then made the decision to suffer the greatest a man would ever suffer, with the intent to bring an infinitely greater help to those who knew Him in His life, as well as to all mankind. This was pure love. This was charity.

Dandelions and Birds

Today, as I was sitting in the car with my babies, I was staring at a field of grass nearby. I sat, noticing all the dandelion stems. Not even the pretty tops, but just the stems. Stems that lead right to the roots. Those things that never seem to truly die, but just populate more and more, and take over the beautiful landscapes.

My daughter was also staring out into the same field. Not pulling her eyes from the field, she says, “Mommy, can I go play with the birds?” I realized that I hadn’t even seen them. Not one. As I thought about missing them completely, I realized that of course I would be focused on the dandelions. Why? My life is hard right now. The lives of loved ones is particularly difficult right now. I don’t understand why everything is happening the way it is, and I have a hard time dealing when so many things are out of my control. My focus is on the weeds that just won’t seem to go away.

It is true that we live with a limited perspective based upon our own life experiences, either those of our past, or, as is the case when life is hard, the experiences of our present situations. In 1 Corinthians 13:12 it says, “For now we see through a glass, darkly; but then face to face: now I know in part; but then shall I know even as also I am known.” I see through a glass, darkly. The more I thought of this I realized that collectively our life experiences would broaden our perspective infinitely. This is why the Lord can help us when we cannot see the way through difficulty. This is why things that we know, with every part of our minds, to be impossible, are possible through Him. In Doctrine and Covenants 88:6-7, we read, “He that ascended up on high, as also he descended below all things, in that he comprehended all things, that he might be in all and through all things, the light of truth; Which truth shineth. …”. He has gained the infinite perspective through the Atonement. This is the gift that He offers to us each and every day of our lives.

So, you who are having difficulties, you who are struggling, take your limited perspective to God. Ask Him to allow His son to help you to see the birds when all you can see are the dandelion stems. He will help you. He will take you out into the field of life and help you see more, to share some of His perfect perspective, and to be able play with the birds, you don’t even know are there.

Numbers Chapter 33

The children of Israel were led by the hand of the Lord from Egypt towards Canaan, which was the promised land of their fathers. It took them the better part of 50 years to make this journey, mostly due to their rebellious and disobedient nature. This chapter begins with a review of the journey they took.

Israel’s Exodus from Egypt and Entry into Canaan (Bible Map 2)

1 These are the journeys of the children of Israel, which went forth out of the land of Egypt with their armies under the hand of Moses and Aaron.
2 And Moses wrote their goings out according to their journeys by the commandment of the Lord: and these are their journeys according to their goings out.
3 And they departed from Rameses in the first month, on the fifteenth day of the first month; on the morrow after the passover the children of Israel went out with an high hand in the sight of all the Egyptians.
4 For the Egyptians buried all their firstborn, which the Lord had smitten among them: upon their gods also the Lord executed judgments.
5 And the children of Israel removed from Rameses, and pitched in Succoth.
6 And they departed from Succoth, and pitched in Etham, which is in the edge of the wilderness.
7 And they removed from Etham, and turned again unto Pi-hahiroth, which is before Baal-zephon: and they pitched before Migdol.
8 And they departed from before Pi-hahiroth, and passed through the midst of the sea into the wilderness, and went three days’ journey in the wilderness of Etham, and pitched in Marah.
9 And they removed from Marah, and came unto Elim: and in Elim were twelve fountains of water, and threescore and ten palm trees; and they pitched there.
10 And they removed from Elim, and encamped by the Red sea.
11 And they removed from the Red sea, and encamped in the wilderness of Sin.
12 And they took their journey out of the wilderness of Sin, and encamped in Dophkah.
13 And they departed from Dophkah, and encamped in Alush.
14 And they removed from Alush, and encamped at Rephidim, where was no water for the people to drink.
15 And they departed from Rephidim, and pitched in the wilderness of Sinai.
16 And they removed from the desert of Sinai, and pitched at Kibroth-hattaavah.
17 And they departed from Kibroth-hattaavah, and encamped at Hazeroth.
18 And they departed from Hazeroth, and pitched in Rithmah.
19 And they departed from Rithmah, and pitched at Rimmon-parez.
20 And they departed from Rimmon-parez, and pitched in Libnah.
21 And they removed from Libnah, and pitched at Rissah.
22 And they journeyed from Rissah, and pitched in Kehelathah.
23 And they went from Kehelathah, and pitched in mount Shapher.
24 And they removed from mount Shapher, and encamped in Haradah.
25 And they removed from Haradah, and pitched in Makheloth.
26 And they removed from Makheloth, and encamped at Tahath.
27 And they departed from Tahath, and pitched at Tarah.
28 And they removed from Tarah, and pitched in Mithcah.
29 And they went from Mithcah, and pitched in Hashmonah.
30 And they departed from Hashmonah, and encamped at Moseroth.
31 And they departed from Moseroth, and pitched in Bene-jaakan.
32 And they removed from Bene-jaakan, and encamped at Hor-hagidgad.
33 And they went from Hor-hagidgad, and pitched in Jotbathah.
34 And they removed from Jotbathah, and encamped at Ebronah.
35 And they departed from Ebronah, and encamped at Ezion-gaber.
36 And they removed from Ezion-gaber, and pitched in the wilderness of Zin, which is Kadesh.
37 And they removed from Kadesh, and pitched in mount Hor, in the edge of the land of Edom.
38 And Aaron the priest went up into mount Hor at the commandment of the Lord, and died there, in the fortieth year after the children of Israel were come out of the land of Egypt, in the first day of the fifth month.
39 And Aaron was an hundred and twenty and three years old when he died in mount Hor.
40 And king Arad the Canaanite, which dwelt in the south in the land of Canaan, heard of the coming of the children of Israel.
41 And they departed from mount Hor, and pitched in Zalmonah.
42 And they departed from Zalmonah, and pitched in Punon.
43 And they departed from Punon, and pitched in Oboth.
44 And they departed from Oboth, and pitched in Ije-abarim, in the border of Moab.
45 And they departed from Iim, and pitched in Dibon-gad.
46 And they removed from Dibon-gad, and encamped in Almon-diblathaim.
47 And they removed from Almon-diblathaim, and pitched in the mountains of Abarim, before Nebo.
48 And they departed from the mountains of Abarim, and pitched in the plains of Moab by Jordan near Jericho.
49 And they pitched by Jordan, from Beth-jesimoth even unto Abel-shittim in the plains of Moab.

I can’t help but add some additional things to this review. The Israelites left Egypt, more specifically the land of Rameses, the day following the first passover, and camped in a place called Succoth. They followed the cloud of the Lord, which led them each day, and camped in Etham, Migdol, and then escaped Pharoah’s army by crossing over the dry land of the Red Sea. They traveled to Marah, where the waters were bitter and they could not drink anything. There Moses showed them the power of the Lord when he turned the water sweet and they were able to drink. They traveled next to Elim, and then they left the area of the Red Sea and went on to the wilderness of Sin. Here they complained about the lack of food and the Lord began to give them manna from heaven. From there, they traveled to Dophkah, Alush, and Rephidim, where there was no water, so the Lord opened the rock in Horeb and provided water for the people. They also fought and won against Amalek, because the Lord provided His strength through Moses holding his arms up to heaven. From there, they took their journey into the wilderness of Sinai. This is where the Lord revealed the commandments and many other great and wonderful things to Moses, such as the instructions for the building of the tabernacle. The people made covenants with the Lord, but then returned to idolatry in the Moses’ absence.

When the children of Israel left Sinai, they headed into the wilderness of Paran, camping in Kibroth-hattaavah. This is where they complained for want of something else to eat and they were given quail and a plague, which brought death to those who lusted after the meat. Next, they encamped in Hazeroth, where Miriam and Aaron desired to have the same power that Moses had been given. Miriam was cursed with leprosy for seven days and afterward, the Israelites journeyed to Rithmah. At Rithmah, Moses sent spies into Hebron in Canaan, and of those who went, only Caleb brought back a report and desire to go in and take the land. All the people murmured, except for Caleb and Joshua, and for this, the rest of the adults were promised that they would not enter the land of promise. The rebels among them were destroyed and this is where the forty years of wandering begins.

The Israelites headed back into the wilderness and camped in Rimmon-parez, Libnah, Rissah, Kehelathah, mount Shapher, Haradah, Makheloth, Tahath, Tarah, Mithcah, Hashmonah, Moseroth, Bene-jaakan, Hor-hagidgad, Jotbathah, Ebronah, Ezion-gaber, and then Kadesh in the wilderness of Zin. As they wandered, there was more rebellion against Moses and the Lord, the rebels were destroyed, and many miracles were performed by the power of God. Kadesh (Meribah) was where Miriam died and where Moses and Aaron sinned against the Lord in taking claim to bringing forth water from the rock. The Israelites tried to go through the land of Edom, but were refused by it’s leader. Instead, they left Kadesh and traveled around the land, headed for mount Hor, where Aaron died, a little more than forty years after they left Egypt. Eleazar, his son, became the high priest in his stead. At this point, Arad, the Canaanite king, became aware of the Israelites heading their way. When the Israelites left mount Hor, they passed through Arad’s land and after he fought them and took some of the Israelites captive, they were blessed with the Lord’s hand in battle against the people of Arad in Hormah. As they traveled from mount Hor, they had the experience with the plague of fiery serpents, because they complained about the manna of the Lord again. They continued on camping in Zalmonah, Punon, Oboth, Ije-abarim (Iim), Dibon-gad, and Almon-diblathaim. Amid these places, the Israelites had to fight some of the inhabitants of the land. With the Lord on their side, they were able to destroy their enemies and take the lands. Next, they camped in the Abarim mountains near mount Nebo.

The final stop on the Israelite journey so far, was in the plains of Moab on the eastern side of the Jordan, across the river from the city of Jericho. Here some returned to idolatry, were tempted by the Midianite women, and experienced a plaque among them. By this time, those who had been promised not to see the promised land, had died. Only Moses, who would see the promised land, but not enter it, was remaining. Moses was called into mount Nebo, where the Lord told him, he was to be taken from the people, and Joshua was called to be his successor in leading the Israelites. Before he was to leave them, the people were commanded to destroy the Midianites. Then, the tribes of Reuben, Gad and part of Manasseh, took their inheritance in the land where they were camped.

50 And the Lord spake unto Moses in the plains of Moab by Jordan near Jericho, saying,
51 Speak unto the children of Israel, and say unto them, When ye are passed over Jordan into the land of Canaan;
52 Then ye shall drive out all the inhabitants of the land from before you, and destroy all their pictures, and destroy all their molten images, and quite pluck down all their high places:
53 And ye shall dispossess the inhabitants of the land, and dwell therein: for I have given you the land to possess it.
54 And ye shall divide the land by lot for an inheritance among your families: and to the more ye shall give the more inheritance, and to the fewer ye shall give the less inheritance: every man’s inheritance shall be in the place where his lot falleth; according to the tribes of your fathers ye shall inherit.
55 But if ye will not drive out the inhabitants of the land from before you; then it shall come to pass, that those which ye let remain of them shall be pricks in your eyes, and thorns in your sides, and shall vex you in the land wherein ye dwell.
56 Moreover it shall come to pass, that I shall do unto you, as I thought to do unto them.

Moses was told to command the people that when they crossed the Jordan, they were to drive the inhabitants out of the land. They were to destroy all of their idols, temples or shrines, and other things the people in the land worshipped. This was to be the land of their possession, the promised land which was given to their fathers, Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob. They were to divide the land as their inheritances with larger portions going to the larger tribes or families. The Lord told them that, if they were to leave any of the inhabitants, they would vex the Israelites and the Lord would treat the children of Israel as the other people would be treated. This is something the Lord does with the willingly rebellious. He removes His hand of protection and guidance and allows the world to do what it will, which usually means some kind of affliction or torment. Then, if they return and repent, he draws them into his protecting arms and blesses them for righteousness.

I think of how much the children of Israel had to experience in order to escape bondage and inherit the promised land. They were tested by the Lord and tempted sorely by the adversary and his angels. Even greater still, they experienced mighty miracles beyond what I can even imagine. Many witnessed the glory of the Lord in some way or another. They watched as the power of God was used to do marvelous wonders, such as dividing the waters of the Red Sea. More than of few of them died from their choices to turn from the Lord, to choose rebellion and wickedness, to murmur against their leaders and against the Lord, and from their lack of faith in God. Still, hundreds of thousands lived to this point of the book of Numbers, when they were just about to gain the home they hoped for. I can’t quite fathom this amount of trial and hardship in life. I know that enduring each day with faith and hope in the blessings, would have been very difficult for even those with the strongest testimonies in the Lord. They must have spent a lot of time pleading for strength from the Lord. I know that if I had lived through that, as I am now, I would have been on my knees a lot.

One of the things that this chapter teaches me, is the importance of reviewing the trials of life that I’ve experienced, in order to see the hand of the Lord in my life. I wonder just how often these people thought about the daily blessing that the Lord was to them. I can say that life can draw my attention away from that very thing, and I know that it is so important. This is possibly part of the reason we should pray at the end of our days. So that we can look back, remember what we have experienced, and be grateful for the things that the Lord has done for us. I know that through this, we can gain greater strength to endure the next day. I am so grateful for the path that I am traveling on, to my own hoped for Home. I know that the Lord will be our guide each day, if we allow Him to be. He will bless us for our faithfulness and also allow us to learn from our choices of disobedience and rebellion. I know that He loves us and truly desires for us to return Home to His presence.

Notes on Patience – Depending on Prayer

Patience is something that is tested in my life every day, as I am sure it is for most of us. I thought that perhaps it would be a good idea for me to begin a study that was a bit more in depth so that I could know how to gain a self-mastery that I do not have right now. I hope that my readers will enjoy following this series of posts on patience and that it may help someone else out there, as much as it has helped me. To see more posts, check out Notes on Patience

If, when evil cometh upon us, as the sword, judgment, or pestilence, or famine, we stand before this house, and in thy presence, (for thy name is in this house,) and cry unto thee in our affliction, then thou wilt hear and help. (2 Chronicles 20:9)

But behold, I, Jacob, would speak unto you that are pure in heart. Look unto God with firmness of mind, and pray unto him with exceeding faith, and he will console you in your afflictions, and he will plead your cause, and send down justice upon those who seek your destruction. (Jacob 3:1)

And thou didst hear me because of mine afflictions and my sincerity; and it is because of thy Son that thou hast been thus merciful unto me, therefore I will cry unto thee in all mine afflictions, for in thee is my joy; for thou hast turned thy judgments away from me, because of thy Son. (Alma 33:11)

And now, O my son Helaman, behold, thou art in thy youth, and therefore, I beseech of thee that thou wilt hear my words and learn of me; for I do know that whosoever shall put their trust in God shall be supported in their trials, and their troubles, and their afflictions, and shall be lifted up at the last day. (Alma 36:3)

And be you afflicted in all his afflictions, ever lifting up your heart unto me in prayer and faith, for his and your deliverance; for I have given unto him power to build up my church among the Lamanites; (D&C 30:6)

30 O Lord God, how long wilt thou suffer that such wickedness and infidelity shall be among this people? O Lord, wilt thou give me strength, that I may bear with mine infirmities. For I am infirm, and such wickedness among this people doth pain my soul.
31 O Lord, my heart is exceedingly sorrowful; wilt thou comfort my soul in Christ. O Lord, wilt thou grant unto me that I may have strength, that I may suffer with patience these afflictions which shall come upon me, because of the iniquity of this people. (Alma 31:30-31)

  • To have a good outcome with my patience, I have to pray. There are things in life, that I cannot handle alone, but with the Lord, I believe I can get through anything. As I was studying this topic earlier, I noticed that my scripture book mark says, “Dear Lord, help me to remember that nothing is going to happen to me that you and I can’t handle…”. That just seems to perfect and fitting. Patience takes trusting that the Lord will help me through anything that comes my way, I just have to remember Him and come unto Him in prayer and faith. I need to pray for the strength and comfort that only He can provide, so that I can patiently endure. I also found a great story of having patience along with prayer, which can be read here: Waiting Patiently on the Lord. Prayer and patience will overcome all things.
  • Notes on Patience – Light at the End of the Tunnel

    Patience is something that is tested in my life every day, as I am sure it is for most of us. I thought that perhaps it would be a good idea for me to begin a study that was a bit more in depth so that I could know how to gain a self-mastery that I do not have right now. I hope that my readers will enjoy following this series of posts on patience and that it may help someone else out there, as much as it has helped me. To see more posts, check out Notes on Patience

    18 And Isaac digged again the wells of water, which they had digged in the days of Abraham his father; for the Philistines had stopped them after the death of Abraham: and he called their names after the names by which his father had called them.
    19 And Isaac’s servants digged in the valley, and found there a well of springing water.
    20 And the herdmen of Gerar did strive with Isaac’s herdmen, saying, The water is ours: and he called the name of the well Esek; because they strove with him.
    21 And they digged another well, and strove for that also: and he called the name of it Sitnah.
    22 And he removed from thence, and digged another well; and for that they strove not: and he called the name of it Rehoboth; and he said, For now the Lord hath made room for us, and we shall be fruitful in the land. (Genesis 26:18-22)

    Verily, verily, I say unto you, That ye shall weep and lament, but the world shall rejoice: and ye shall be sorrowful, but your sorrow shall be turned into joy. (John 16:20)

    32 But all things must come to pass in their time.
    33 Wherefore, be not weary in well-doing, for ye are laying the foundation of a great work. And out of small things proceedeth that which is great. (D&C 64:32-33)

    These things I have spoken unto you, that in me ye might have peace. In the world ye shall have tribulation: but be of good cheer; I have overcome the world. (John 16:33)

  • Sometimes life throws curveballs at us and it seems like the trials come in groups. I may have to try the same thing several times, before seeing a positive result. There will always be a light at the end of the tunnel, or a blessing after times of trials. The good will always prevail, the prophecies will be fulfilled. I have great hope and faith in that. Having patience, even when things seem completely out of my control, will be the way to see the good and the light that is just around the next corner. If I fail at something that I know is good for me or my family, I need to continue in patience and try again, as many times as it may take for that thing to happen. I do this, because the Savior has already overcome all that there is that stands against that which is good, and is ready to help me if I am willing.
  • Notes on Patience – Nourishing Faith

    Patience is something that is tested in my life every day, as I am sure it is for most of us. I thought that perhaps it would be a good idea for me to begin a study that was a bit more in depth so that I could know how to gain a self-mastery that I do not have right now. I hope that my readers will enjoy following this series of posts on patience and that it may help someone else out there, as much as it has helped me. To see more posts, check out Notes on Patience

    Faith is a Sunrise

    40 And thus, if ye will not nourish the word, looking forward with an eye of faith to the fruit thereof, ye can never pluck of the fruit of the tree of life.
    41 But if ye will nourish the word, yea, nourish the tree as it beginneth to grow, by your faith with great diligence, and with patience, looking forward to the fruit thereof, it shall take root; and behold it shall be a tree springing up unto everlasting life.
    42 And because of your diligence and your faith and your patience with the word in nourishing it, that it may take root in you, behold, by and by ye shall pluck the fruit thereof, which is most precious, which is sweet above all that is sweet, and which is white above all that is white, yea, and pure above all that is pure; and ye shall feast upon this fruit even until ye are filled, that ye hunger not, neither shall ye thirst.
    43 Then, my brethren, ye shall reap the rewards of your faith, and your diligence, and patience, and long-suffering, waiting for the tree to bring forth fruit unto you. (Alma 32:40-43 emphasis added)

    3 And as ye have desired of my beloved brother that he should make known unto you what ye should do, because of your afflictions; and he hath spoken somewhat unto you to prepare your minds; yea, and he hath exhorted you unto faith and to patience
    4 Yea, even that ye would have so much faith as even to plant the word in your hearts, that ye may try the experiment of its goodness. (Alma 34:3-4 emphasis added)

  • My faith will take time to become what it can become. It needs to be patiently nourished by acting upon the principles of the gospel. Without patience my faith will never become strong enough to stand firm and I will be vulnerable when difficulties come. This means that I should have patience and do what is right when times are going well, so that I can have the strength when times are hard. It takes working patiently every day of my life, with great diligence, to develop a strong and secure faith.
  • Exodus Chapter 5

    Moses had returned to Egypt with his brother and spokesman, Aaron. They met with the Elders and showed them that they had been called of God to deliver them from Pharaoh. The book of Exodus continues as follows:

    1 And afterward Moses and Aaron went in, and told Pharaoh, Thus saith the Lord God of Israel, Let my people go, that they may hold a feast unto me in the wilderness.
    2 And Pharaoh said, Who is the Lord, that I should obey his voice to let Israel go? I know not the Lord, neither will I let Israel go.
    3 And they said, The God of the Hebrews hath met with us: let us go, we pray thee, three days’ journey into the desert, and sacrifice unto the Lord our God; lest he fall upon us with pestilence, or with the sword.
    4 And the king of Egypt said unto them, Wherefore do ye, Moses and Aaron, let the people from their works? get you unto your burdens.
    5 And Pharaoh said, Behold, the people of the land now are many, and ye make them rest from their burdens.
    6 And Pharaoh commanded the same day the taskmasters of the people, and their officers, saying,
    7 Ye shall no more give the people straw to make brick, as heretofore: let them go and gather straw for themselves.
    8 And the tale of the bricks, which they did make heretofore, ye shall lay upon them; ye shall not diminish ought thereof: for they be idle; therefore they cry, saying, Let us go and sacrifice to our God.
    9 Let there more work be laid upon the men, that they may labour therein; and let them not regard vain words.

    Just as God had commanded Moses, he and Aaron went to Pharaoh and asked him to set Israel free so that they might worship Him. Pharaoh did not believe in the God of Israel, and so he would not let the people go. Pharaoh told them to get back to their work and added greater work to the Israelites as well, because he felt they must not have been working hard enough. Pharaoh said basically that this would show them not to come to him with these types of requests, which he considered to be in vain.

    10 And the taskmasters of the people went out, and their officers, and they spake to the people, saying, Thus saith Pharaoh, I will not give you straw.
    11 Go ye, get you straw where ye can find it: yet not ought of your work shall be diminished.
    12 So the people were scattered abroad throughout all the land of Egypt to gather stubble instead of straw.
    13 And the taskmasters hasted them, saying, Fulfil your works, your daily tasks, as when there was straw.
    14 And the officers of the children of Israel, which Pharaoh’s taskmasters had set over them, were beaten, and demanded, Wherefore have ye not fulfilled your task in making brick both yesterday and to day, as heretofore?

    The burdens of the Israelites were made significantly heavier, because of Pharaoh’s reaction to Moses and Aaron.

    15 Then the officers of the children of Israel came and cried unto Pharaoh, saying, Wherefore dealest thou thus with thy servants?
    16 There is no straw given unto thy servants, and they say to us, Make brick: and, behold, thy servants are beaten; but the fault is in thine own people.
    17 But he said, Ye are idle, ye are idle: therefore ye say, Let us go and do sacrifice to the Lord.
    18 Go therefore now, and work; for there shall no straw be given you, yet shall ye deliver the tale of bricks.
    19 And the officers of the children of Israel did see that they were in evil case, after it was said, Ye shall not minish ought from your bricks of your daily task.

    The Israelites wanted to know why they were expected to accomplish the same amount of work without the supplies needed to do that work. Pharaoh let them know that it was because he felt they were making a request to be idle by asking to go and worship their God.

    20 And they met Moses and Aaron, who stood in the way, as they came forth from Pharaoh:
    21 And they said unto them, The Lord look upon you, and judge; because ye have made our savour to be abhorred in the eyes of Pharaoh, and in the eyes of his servants, to put a sword in their hand to slay us.
    22 And Moses returned unto the Lord, and said, Lord, wherefore hast thou so evil entreated this people? why is it that thou hast sent me?
    23 For since I came to Pharaoh to speak in thy name, he hath done evil to this people; neither hast thou delivered thy people at all.

    The Israelites placed blame on Moses and Aaron. Moses prayed to know why God had sent him and not delivered them already, but instead, allowed Pharaoh to treat the children of Israel worst than before.

    It is sad that the Israelites would doubt that the blessings would come to them through the servant of God. I wonder how I would have felt if I were in this position and sadly I can imagine feeling the same way. They had it hard before, and now they were being made to suffer so much more because of Moses and his request. I am sure that their faith was not very strong yet, that they would have anticipated their deliverance from Egypt. This is a lesson to us, that we cannot possibly understand the wisdom of God’s timing. The Israelites would be delivered as he had promised, but they needed to trust in His timing. This was a trial of faith for these people. They needed to show their faith in God and their trust in Moses as his chosen servant. We have need to show our own faith in God and trust in our leaders today. This takes a great level of patience and humility on our part. If we can endure our trials well, without complaint or blaming someone else, we will also have our deliverance and great blessings.

    Notes on Patience – Enduring Trials in Righteousness

    Patience is something that is tested in my life every day, as I am sure it is for most of us. I thought that perhaps it would be a good idea for me to begin a study that was a bit more in depth so that I could know how to gain a self-mastery that I do not have right now. I hope that my readers will enjoy following this series of posts on patience and that it may help someone else out there, as much as it has helped me. To see more posts, check out Notes on Patience

    For what glory is it, if, when ye be buffeted for your faults, ye shall take it patiently? but if, when ye do well, and suffer for it, ye take it patiently, this is acceptable with God. (1 Peter 2:20)

  • It’s good to have patience no matter what, but it is better to be patient when I’m doing what is right and am made to suffer for it, than it is when I am doing wrong and suffer for my own faults. There are greater blessings for having trials and enduring them well, because it shows dedication and faith to the Lord and his gospel.
  • Exodus Chapter 1

    At the ending of the book of Genesis, the record is no longer according to the patriarchal line. Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob have all left their mortal lives. Joseph, also died, leaving his Israelite family as servants in Egypt. Their servitude was due to Pharaoh allowing them to be saved from famine many years earlier, so therefore they had willing gone into this type of bondage to spare the lives of their family. This marks the beginning of the book of Exodus. It begins as follows:

    1 Now these are the names of the children of Israel, which came into Egypt; every man and his household came with Jacob.
    2 Reuben, Simeon, Levi, and Judah,
    3 Issachar, Zebulun, and Benjamin,
    4 Dan, and Naphtali, Gad, and Asher.
    5 And all the souls that came out of the loins of Jacob were seventy souls: for Joseph was in Egypt already.
    6 And Joseph died, and all his brethren, and all that generation.

    Jacob had brought 70 members of his family into Egypt and by this time the generation of Joseph had all died there in Egypt.

    7 And the children of Israel were fruitful, and increased abundantly, and multiplied, and waxed exceeding mighty; and the land was filled with them.
    8 Now there arose up a new king over Egypt, which knew not Joseph.
    9 And he said unto his people, Behold, the people of the children of Israel are more and mightier than we:
    10 Come on, let us deal wisely with them; lest they multiply, and it come to pass, that, when there falleth out any war, they join also unto our enemies, and fight against us, and so get them up out of the land.
    11 Therefore they did set over them taskmasters to afflict them with their burdens. And they built for Pharaoh treasure cities, Pithom and Raamses.
    12 But the more they afflicted them, the more they multiplied and grew. And they were grieved because of the children of Israel.
    13 And the Egyptians made the children of Israel to serve with rigour:
    14 And they made their lives bitter with hard bondage, in morter, and in brick, and in all manner of service in the field: all their service, wherein they made them serve, was with rigour.

    As the blessings of their fathers were still upon them, they continued to grow in number and strength. The Pharaoh whom had loved Joseph for saving his people, died and a new king was in power in Egypt. He did not recognize the same value of the Israelites and was concerned over the strength and number of the Israelites. To prevent a future take-over by the children of Israel, Pharaoh placed them in greater bondage. They gave them heavy burdens and taskmasters. Then the Egyptians had them act as builders. In spite of their burdens, the children of Israel continued to grow. Their burdens were made greater by the Egyptians as they were made to build all that Pharaoh wanted. The footnote to the word taskmasters in verse 11, refers back to Genesis 15:13, where we learn that the people would be afflicted for 400 years in this strange land. They had many generations to live this way from the time when Jacob first came to the land of Egypt with his family. It has not been an uncommon thing for the righteous children of the Lord, to be placed in bondage of some form. It gives the righteous the opportunity to learn great humility, faith and hope, while giving the unrighteous their own opportunity to change their ways or to cause their future judgements of God to have just rewards (those like Satan’s rewards) for their actions.

    15 And the king of Egypt spake to the Hebrew midwives, of which the name of the one was Shiphrah, and the name of the other Puah:
    16 And he said, When ye do the office of a midwife to the Hebrew women, and see them upon the stools; if it be a son, then ye shall kill him: but if it be a daughter, then she shall live.
    17 But the midwives feared God, and did not as the king of Egypt commanded them, but saved the men children alive.
    18 And the king of Egypt called for the midwives, and said unto them, Why have ye done this thing, and have saved the men children alive?
    19 And the midwives said unto Pharaoh, Because the Hebrew women are not as the Egyptian women; for they are lively, and are delivered ere the midwives come in unto them.
    20 Therefore God dealt well with the midwives: and the people multiplied, and waxed very mighty.
    21 And it came to pass, because the midwives feared God, that he made them houses.
    22 And Pharaoh charged all his people, saying, Every son that is born ye shall cast into the river, and every daughter ye shall save alive.

    In order to prevent such growth among the Israelites, Pharaoh commanded the midwives of the Hebrew women, to kill their newborn sons and let newborn daughters live. The midwives were faithful to God and did not follow the command of Pharaoh. Pharaoh asked the midwives why they did not follow his command. They told him that the women were able to deliver their children before the midwives could get there. The midwives who would not kill the children, were blessed for their choices. Then Pharaoh commanded, that after these children were born, all the sons were to be thrown into the river to die.

    There are many even today, who like Pharaoh in the time of the Israelite bondage, fear for the growth in number and strength of the faithful. Satan is also concerned for that growth. He entices people to find any means of placing those of faith into all different types of bondage. If we are not watchful, we may not even realize the traps he has set for us. There are many things that can be there to help us in times of need, just as Pharaoh was there for the family of Jacob in their time of need. If, however, we do not continue to keep our feet firmly planted in faith and reverence towards God, we can loose our way and become caught in those traps. If we still find ourselves in bondage, even though we are people of great faith in God, He will help us to be able to continue to multiply and grow in the face of our adversity. God has the power to bless the righteous with the ability to endure trials well so that they can receive all the blessings He has in store for them. I am grateful for my own trials and for the growth that I have achieved by enduring them in faith. I recognize the times in my life, when I have let my faith waiver and there is such a difference in the outcome and in what I learn at those times. I believe that it is important for us to be watchful, strong and faithful through our trials, in order to receive the fullness of the blessings that God has waiting for us.


    About My Scripture Study Buddy

    I am a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints. I love the scriptures, but I am not a scriptorian. I've been told that I'm too "deep" for some, but if you are willing, I'd love to have others join me in my quest for a greater understanding of the gospel. Please feel free to leave me comments and hopefully we can help each other to learn.
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