2 Kings Chapter 7

During the time of Elisha the prophet, there was a famine in the land of Samaria. The hosts of Syria had sieged Samaria and the people were in desperate times. The king of Israel had sent a man to kill Elisha, because it would seem to him, that Elisha and his God had caused their trouble. Elisha had the man stopped and held in place at the door. The servant of the king openly blamed the Lord. This chapter goes on to say:

1 Then Elisha said, Hear ye the word of the Lord; Thus saith the Lord, To morrow about this time shall a measure of fine flour be sold for a shekel, and two measures of barley for a shekel, in the gate of Samaria.
2 Then a lord on whose hand the king leaned answered the man of God, and said, Behold, if the Lord would make windows in heaven, might this thing be? And he said, Behold, thou shalt see it with thine eyes, but shalt not eat thereof.

Elisha prophesied that things would turn around quickly for the people in Samaria. In fact, he said that within a day, the price of their goods would fall. A lord, or an officer of the king, doubted that this would happen and Elisha said that the lord would see it happen, but would not experience it himself.

3 And there were four leprous men at the entering in of the gate: and they said one to another, Why sit we here until we die?
4 If we say, We will enter into the city, then the famine is in the city, and we shall die there: and if we sit still here, we die also. Now therefore come, and let us fall unto the host of the Syrians: if they save us alive, we shall live; and if they kill us, we shall but die.
5 And they rose up in the twilight, to go unto the camp of the Syrians: and when they were come to the uttermost part of the camp of Syria, behold, there was no man there.
6 For the Lord had made the host of the Syrians to hear a noise of chariots, and a noise of horses, even the noise of a great host: and they said one to another, Lo, the king of Israel hath hired against us the kings of the Hittites, and the kings of the Egyptians, to come upon us.
7 Wherefore they arose and fled in the twilight, and left their tents, and their horses, and their asses, even the camp as it was, and fled for their life.
8 And when these lepers came to the uttermost part of the camp, they went into one tent, and did eat and drink, and carried thence silver, and gold, and raiment, and went and hid it; and came again, and entered into another tent, and carried thence also, and went and hid it.
9 Then they said one to another, We do not well: this day is a day of good tidings, and we hold our peace: if we tarry till the morning light, some mischief will come upon us: now therefore come, that we may go and tell the king’s household.
10 So they came and called unto the porter of the city: and they told them, saying, We came to the camp of the Syrians, and, behold, there was no man there, neither voice of man, but horses tied, and asses tied, and the tents as they were.
11 And he called the porters; and they told it to the king’s house within.

Four men with leprosy, who had been living at the entrance of the city, wondered why they would stay there until they died, since the city was in a time of famine. They would die from famine in the city or die where they were, so they had nothing to loose. They decided to go against the Syrians and see if they remained alive with the Syrians or died at their hands. When they arrived at the center of the camp of the Syrians, they found it deserted. The Lord had caused the Syrians to flee from the sounds of chariots, horses and a great army, possibly an army much like the one that had been surrounding Elisha when he had reassured his servant (see 2 Kings 6). Thinking that a large host of men of other nations was upon them, they ran away, leaving everything behind. The lepers went into one of the tents, ate and drank what was there, and took the spoil from the tent and hid it. After doing this a second time, they realized that this was not the right thing to do. They had good tidings to bring to their people, but they kept it to themselves. They knew that if they kept it secret, something bad would happen to them, so they knew they needed to get word to the king. They returned to the city and passed word along of what they had found.

12 And the king arose in the night, and said unto his servants, I will now shew you what the Syrians have done to us. They know that we be hungry; therefore are they gone out of the camp to hide themselves in the field, saying, When they come out of the city, we shall catch them alive, and get into the city.
13 And one of his servants answered and said, Let some take, I pray thee, five of the horses that remain, which are left in the city, (behold, they are as all the multitude of Israel that are left in it: behold, I say, they are even as all the multitude of the Israelites that are consumed:) and let us send and see.
14 They took therefore two chariot horses; and the king sent after the host of the Syrians, saying, Go and see.
15 And they went after them unto Jordan: and, lo, all the way was full of garments and vessels, which the Syrians had cast away in their haste. And the messengers returned, and told the king.
16 And the people went out, and spoiled the tents of the Syrians. So a measure of fine flour was sold for a shekel, and two measures of barley for a shekel, according to the word of the Lord.

The king suspected that the Syrians were going to trick them. He told his servants that since they were a starving people, when they went out to the Syrian camp, they would be caught by the Syrians, who were most assuredly in lying in wait for them. They the Syrians would take over the city. A servant of the king suggested that they have a few men take five of their remaining horses and see what happened. So, two chariot horses and a few men went by the direction of the king. As they headed towards Jordan, they found all the things that the Syrians had left behind as they fled. The men returned to the king and told him what they saw. The people of Samaria, went out and gathered the spoils of the Syrians, and the words of the Lord were fulfilled, as they had been spoken by Elisha.

17 And the king appointed the lord on whose hand he leaned to have the charge of the gate: and the people trode upon him in the gate, and he died, as the man of God had said, who spake when the king came down to him.
18 And it came to pass as the man of God had spoken to the king, saying, Two measures of barley for a shekel, and a measure of fine flour for a shekel, shall be to morrow about this time in the gate of Samaria:
19 And that lord answered the man of God, and said, Now, behold, if the Lord should make windows in heaven, might such a thing be? And he said, Behold, thou shalt see it with thine eyes, but shalt not eat thereof.
20 And so it fell out unto him: for the people trode upon him in the gate, and he died.

The lord, or officer, who had doubted the prophecy, was placed in charge of the entrance of the city. The people trampled upon him where he worked and he died before eating of the spoils, just as Elisha had prophesied.

In this chapter, the Lord blessed the people in Samaria. When they had ‘hit rock bottom’ and had nothing left to loose, he spared them from a fight against the Syrians. Moreover, He blessed them with the things they stood in desperate need of having, such as food. It was yet, another miracle, and because Elisha had prophesied of their prosperity, it was another witness that the Lord was the God of Israel. It took a measure of faith in the prophesies of Elisha, small as it was, for the king of Israel to allow any men to go and see if the word of the lepers was the truth. Because he allowed his men to check, all of his people were blessed. The Lord blesses people today with many things, even miracles such a this. He continues to give us opportunities to witness that He is the Lord of all the earth. I am so grateful for the blessings and miracles, both those seen and those that have been hidden from my natural eyes, that have been a part of my life. I know that I am the woman of faith and testimony that I am today, because of the trials of my faith and the resulting blessings and miracles of the Lord.

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