Leviticus Chapter 24

The book of Leviticus continues to cover the law of Moses, as received from the Lord. The children of Israel were given instruction for daily life, as well as specifics commandments regarding the holy tabernacle. The word of the Lord continues as follows:

1 And the Lord spake unto Moses, saying,
2 Command the children of Israel, that they bring unto thee pure oil olive beaten for the light, to cause the lamps to burn continually.
3 Without the veil of the testimony, in the tabernacle of the congregation, shall Aaron order it from the evening unto the morning before the Lord continually: it shall be a statute for ever in your generations.
4 He shall order the lamps upon the pure candlestick before the Lord continually.

The Israelites were to provide pure oil for lighting the lamps in the tabernacle of the congregation. The lamps were to be continually burning and the sons of Aaron were to make sure they were trimmed and lit at all times. I’d like to think about why it was necessary for the lamps to be lit at all times. If the lamps were lit, the spirit of the Lord would dwell with them. I wonder if this was evidence of the spirits of the Israelites. If there came a time, or rather when there was a time, when the lamps went out, it would have been due to disobedience or apathy of the people. When people get to that point, the spirit of the Lord cannot dwell among them. Likewise, our own spiritual lamps must be lit at all times. We cannot allow life to draw us away from this duty. If we do not keep the lamp of faith burning in our hearts, the spirit will withdraw from us.

5 And thou shalt take fine flour, and bake twelve cakes thereof: two tenth deals shall be in one cake.
6 And thou shalt set them in two rows, six on a row, upon the pure table before the Lord.
7 And thou shalt put pure frankincense upon each row, that it may be on the bread for a memorial, even an offering made by fire unto the Lord.
8 Every sabbath he shall set it in order before the Lord continually, being taken from the children of Israel by an everlasting covenant.
9 And it shall be Aaron’s and his sons’; and they shall eat it in the holy place: for it is most holy unto him of the offerings of the Lord made by fire by a perpetual statute.

They were commanded to have twelves loaves of bread, or shewbread, with frankincense, in rows on the table within the tabernacle. This was a memorial and offering to the Lord. I am figuring that the number was twelve, to represent the tribes of Israel and the covenant between them and God. This was an offering, which the sons of Aaron were to eat. Reminding me, once again, of the sacrament we partake of each week to renew our own covenants with God.

10 And the son of an Israelitish woman, whose father was an Egyptian, went out among the children of Israel: and this son of the Israelitish woman and a man of Israel strove together in the camp;
11 And the Israelitish woman’s son blasphemed the name of the Lord, and cursed. And they brought him unto Moses: (and his mother’s name was Shelomith, the daughter of Dibri, of the tribe of Dan:)
12 And they put him in ward, that the mind of the Lord might be shewed them.
13 And the Lord spake unto Moses, saying,
14 Bring forth him that hath cursed without the camp; and let all that heard him lay their hands upon his head, and let all the congregation stone him.
15 And thou shalt speak unto the children of Israel, saying, Whosoever curseth his God shall bear his sin.
16 And he that blasphemeth the name of the Lord, he shall surely be put to death, and all the congregation shall certainly stone him: as well the stranger, as he that is born in the land, when he blasphemeth the name of the Lord, shall be put to death.

There was a man of the Israelite tribe of Dan, and of Egyptian blood. He was out among the people along with another Israelite man. The first committed blasphemy, and was then taken and brought to Moses. As a witness of what was done, those who heard him were to lay their hands upon him. Then he was to be put to death by stoning. Moses was to teach the people that any who cursed God, Israelite or stranger, was to be held accountable for that sin and would be put to death by stoning.

17 And he that killeth any man shall surely be put to death.
18 And he that killeth a beast shall make it good; beast for beast.
19 And if a man cause a blemish in his neighbour; as he hath done, so shall it be done to him;
20 Breach for breach, eye for eye, tooth for tooth: as he hath caused a blemish in a man, so shall it be done to him again.
21 And he that killeth a beast, he shall restore it: and he that killeth a man, he shall be put to death.
22 Ye shall have one manner of law, as well for the stranger, as for one of your own country: for I am the Lord your God.

Moses was to teach them again, that anyone who killed another, would be put to death. Those who killed someone’s animal, was to give equally to that individual. Moses was told the law was eye for an eye and tooth for a tooth. Those who hurt or killed another, would receive punishment in kind. The law would be the same for the Israelites and any who came into their camp or land from without.

23 And Moses spake to the children of Israel, that they should bring forth him that had cursed out of the camp, and stone him with stones. And the children of Israel did as the Lord commanded Moses.

Moses went and commanded the people those things that God had said.

Most of these things have been mentioned already in the previous chapters of the Bible. Repeated instruction on the way things should be in the tabernacle, was necessary to keep it a holy place to the Lord. The people knew well enough to bring a sinner to the prophet for what they should do, but may have needed multiple reminders of the law before they knew just what to do when something happened. I wonder what life would be like now if the law of Moses was practiced all over the world. If people knew any kind of punishment would come with cursing the Lord, would they take his name in vain so frequently? I doubt it. If there was laws now that required the death penalty for all those who killed others, would it happen as often as it does? If it was standard for someone to make restitution for hurting another, by being hurt themselves, would people be gentler towards others? Moreover, I wonder what kind of punishments I would have received for the things I have done in my life or what kind of person I would be today if the law of Moses was still in place. It is not today, because the Savior fulfilled that law and gave the higher law to men. More is expected of us, but the punishments are more often spiritual and therefore of greater significance than something just physical. In Matthew 5 we read the following words of the Savior:

38 Ye have heard that it hath been said, An eye for an eye, and a tooth for a tooth:
39 But I say unto you, That ye resist not evil: but whosoever shall smite thee on thy right cheek, turn to him the other also.

Jesus teaches us that as the one offended or hurt by another, we should have mercy on them and forgive them. I’ve heard it said that usually when others are of a mind to hurt someone, it is because they are lacking in something, such as love or self-worth. Punishments according the law are fine, but the greater response from us personally, is to give them our forgiveness and kindness. We cannot say that anything done to us is an exception to this, because of the example from the Savior himself. He allowed others to hurt him, break him, and kill him, and in the end he pled for their forgiveness from God.

Being forgiving and showing mercy to others is a very difficult thing at times, but I know that our lives are better for it. I hope that I can live my life worthy of spiritual blessings and not of those things that would punish me spiritually. I also hope that others will find it in their hearts to forgiven me of the many things I may do to offend them. I know that in forgiving others we are forgiven, and in being merciful, we find mercy. Hopefully, more of us can find the strength and faith to live as the Lord commands.

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